Bowls not necessarily full of cherries per se, idioms, proverbs and misinterpretations

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English is a funny language. I was meandering around the internet and was going to blog saying ‘life is like a bowl of cherries’ as I was having a good day, had enjoyed great company and so on.  Then I decided to actually do my own mini research about the saying and I realised someone could misinterpret my words.  You see, those actual words, ‘life is like a bowl of cherries’ are often used sarcastically or humorously as an idiom or turn of phrase whereas I have always used them at face value.  I don’t think I have ever turned them around.

cherriesYou see, I would think it is akin to taking from a luscious bowl of juicy fruit.  If you dive in then you take a chance on something nice.  Dive in once, one chance, dive in twice, two and so on.  So, if life is like a bowl of cherries then life is good. It is good today – if my earlier companion is reading this!

 

seventiestrousersWhat about ‘honesty is the best policy’? Is it? I tend to think so but I can waver on this one.  When asked ‘does my bum look big in this?’ I might not answer exactly, but if I did think the vision unflattering I would suggest a change of outfit as the person may look better in something different.  I wouldn’t say they had a big rear, but would be kinder with my words.  Remembering a recent shopping trip with a friend makes me giggle. I picked up a pair of trousers and asked her if she thought I could wear them.  Her answer was ‘not when with me’.  We roared with laughter so much the shop assistant frowned at the disturbance of her peace!

 

At another angle, I am definitely a ‘glass half full’ kind of person.  I have been told I have a sunny personality,  I hope I think in more positive ways than negative.  Even saying ‘glass half full’ could start a discussion about proverbial phrases and are you a ‘half full’ or ‘half empty’ type.  Which, if any, is correct?

Proverbs, another whole host of sayings that can get confusing.  ‘A watched pot never boils’ – yes it does if it’s on the correct heat source and you don’t take your eyes off it! ‘Absence makes the heart grow fonder’ – yes it can (in my family it does) but sometimes it makes you realise you aren’t looking forward to that person coming back! You see, just a couple of strange examples here.  I could spout for hours.

I enjoyed English at school, one of my favourite subjects. Perhaps I need to go back to learn how to use it properly.

As I finish, I shall end with a favourite of mine

A little of what you fancy does you good….

knitcolknit
Now sitting knitting ..

 

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4 thoughts on “Bowls not necessarily full of cherries per se, idioms, proverbs and misinterpretations

    creatinganddesigning said:
    November 17, 2018 at 10:49 am

    I like those jeans in the picture…! And I definitely agree, A little bit of what you fancy does you good!

    suzlearnsfrench said:
    November 28, 2018 at 11:15 am

    I actually have never heard that before – a little bit of fancy…, but I like it. I have heard – if it tickles your fancy. I think these two phrases might be related / similar. Love the picture of the cherries.

    quietwatercraft said:
    December 22, 2018 at 7:27 am

    I got a book for Christmas on the origins of some of our sayings and proverbs, I love that kind of thing! Our language is so interesting

      tinaor responded:
      December 22, 2018 at 11:06 am

      It is indeed

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