Month: March 2014

Purples are done…yes!

Posted on

Lovely purples, I just want to grab one, ball it up and think of a project to begin !

The Sheepwalk Fiber Arts Studio™

Note: That I spent the afternoon winding skeins but have not yet named most the purples.

View original post

Advertisements

I fancied a bit of sewing time

Posted on

Imageng, I have a stash of fabric as well as a stash of yarn. I’ve always dabbled with making things. Watching the Great British Sewing Bee recently has really spurred me on to get the sewing machine out again. The programme’s participants skill and knowledge astound me but I also love that they get it ‘wrong’ sometimes too.  It is so real!  I wouldn’t say sewing comes to me as easily as knitting does but I learn more techniques as I make different things. Perhaps other people make things quicker but I am enjoying what I am doing and that’s important to me.  If I look back at some of my ‘disasters’ I can still laugh at myself !  I remember a cotton summer top I made about 4 years ago. It was always too long and didn’t fit properly as the facing was too stiff.  It lived in a drawer for a whole year, then the next summer I jiggled with it and loved wearing it so much that the colour faded and it look quite jaded by the end of just one season.

My mother was a dressmaker when I was a very little girl.  When us children went to bed mum would sew for her customers. I guess we just got in the way and we lived in a little house so there wasn’t much space for cutting out when we were up and about. She was very skilled and passed on a little knowledge to me, though I don’t think I was really interested at the time.  Oh, what I would give to have her here now. It now seems a shame to have lived my teens through the 1980’s when it was more ‘fashionable’ to buy cheap foreign imports and not make my own garments.  I have memories of my mum fingering ready made clothes, saying ‘look at that price, you could make it for a lot less!’, whilst I grimaced and dreamed of owning something not homemade!  I hated my homemade school uniform in particular, but I think I got off lightly compared to my sister who definitely had more than me.

So, here’s just a little pic showing things I made this week. I am on a bit of a pincushion frenzy! 

Knitted Wristies

Posted on Updated on

wristies

I just thought I’d pop a little knitting pattern on here.  These wristies were a little project from 2013 – I made several pairs for myself, a good friend and my sister in law.  I feel the cold a lot – so I love to keep my hands toastie, especially when driving and gloves with fingers get in the way. My good friend Jess was working at a primary school and needed a pair to keep her hands warm during winter playground duty, so gratefully received her pair.  And my sis in law commutes to London by train – BR trains aren’t always warm so gloves/wristies can be absolute necessity on board some days.  All in all fairly quick projects, gratefully received. 

 

The wristies have a scallop 4 row pattern, are knitted on straight needles , then sewn together with buttons for show only and a hole for your thumb to pop through.  I used a British 100% pure wool – Woolyknit Diggle DK.  These are very warm and cosy, practical for keeping your arm warm without compromising grip when your fingertips are needed.

 

Materials:  50g/122m Double knit yarn – I used Woolyknit Diggle DK, Pair of 4mm knitting needles,  10 small buttons,   Sewing Up Needle

                                               

 

Abbreviations/Special Notes:

K= knit

P = purl

K2tog = knit two stitches together

YO = bring yarn over before working next stitch (towards the knitter, not away from her/him)

St = stitches

 

Left Hand

** Break off 1m of yarn and keep it safe for future use. You will need this when making thumb hole halfway through wristie.

Working from the main ball of yarn, using appropriate needle size to yarn gauge, cast on 52 st

 

Pattern :

Row 1: Knit

Row 2: Purl

Row 3: K2, *(K2tog,) x 2, (yo, k1) x 4), (k2tog) x 2; repeat from * to last 2 sts, k2

Row 4: Knit

 

Work 27 rows of pattern  finishing on a Row 3.  **

Now you make the hole for the thumb.  Knit 6st.  Cast off 9 sts . Knit to end.

Next Row: Knit to cast off stitches. Using spare yarn (first instruction for each Wristie!), cast on and knit 9 sts. Knit to end of row.

 

Continue as before in pattern, starting with a Row 2. Work 27 rows of pattern for double knit, ending on a Row 4.

Work 6 rows in knit stitch only.  Cast off loosely.

 

 

Right Hand

** Break off 1m of of yarn and keep it safe for future use .  You will need this when making thumb hole halfway through wristie.

Working from the main ball of yarn, cast on 52 st

 

Pattern :

Row 1: Knit

Row 2: Purl

Row 3: K2, *(K2tog,) x 2, (yo, k1) x 4), (k2tog) x 2; repeat from * to last 2 sts, k2

Row 4: Knit

 

Work 27 rows of pattern finishing on a Row 3.  **

 

Now thumbhole row.  Knit to last 15st. Cast off Cast off 9 sts. Knit to end (6 st.)

 

Next row: Knit to cast off stitches. Using spare yarn (first instruction for each Wristie!), cast on and knit 9 sts .  Knit to end of row.

 

Continue as before in pattern, starting with a Row 2. Work 27 rows of pattern, ending on a Row 4.

Work 6 rows in knit stitch only.  Cast off loosely.

 

Finishing your wristies

Fold each wristie into a ‘tube’ (imagine it on your arm/hand), cast on edge overlaps cast off edge (the 6 rows of knit only are on the underside).  Pin to help you mark button positions. Sew a button on each scallop through both layers to hold the wristie together.   5 buttons per wristie.